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Interview Invites 2020-21
(Yesterday, 03:07 PM)Guest Wrote: What are the top 5 academic programs today?

IMO, in no particular order: MGH, UCSF, JHU, Duke, Pitt
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(Yesterday, 03:07 PM)Guest Wrote: What are the top 5 academic programs today?

There are so many ways this could be defined:
- Produce the most chairmen
- Produce the most academics
- Produce the most R01 funded neurosurgeons
- Have the most NIH funding
- Residents produce the most research
- Have the best balance of operating and research
- Best historic reputations
- Best current reputations

And obviously these very greatly based on your area of interest.

Honestly, decide what's best for you and it will become clear which programs are best at that. Rankings are silly in that they should be different for every person.
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(Yesterday, 03:07 PM)Guest Wrote: What are the top 5 academic programs today?

Loaded question. Definitely depends upon what you mean by "academic". If you mean top NIH funding recipient by Neurosurgery department, then its: 1) UCSF, 2) Stanford, 3) Baylor (not counting MD Anderson), 4) Duke, 5) UCLA (source: Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research http://www.brimr.org/NIH_Awards/2019/NIH...s_2019.htm)

But if you mean the department w/ the most productive residents, the latest bibliometric study suggests its: 1) TJU, 2) UPMC/Pitt, 3) Barrow, 4) JHU, 5) Mayo (source: Khan et al, 2019 https://doi.org/10.1093/neuros/nyy217) 

And if you mean "academic" in "able to get you into an academic job post-residency," then the latest published study is from 2011 and it would appear to be: 1) UPMC/Pitt, 2) UCSF, 3) Columbia, 4) MGH, 5) UW (Source: Campbell et al 2011 https://doi.org/10.3171/2011.3.JNS101176). 

However there have been substantial changes since that was published. Also, it can't account for differences in how willing faculty are to stump for you. Additionally, some programs that have been shamed as "non-academic" e.g. the Barrow, have shown they can place people in academic jobs if the residents want (3/4 of BNIs 2020 class went academic or "privademic"). So at the end of the day, whether a program is considered an "academic powerhouse" or not probably has less relevance on your ultimate career placement and happiness than your fit with the residents and individual initiative. Because regardless of where you go, it is incumbent upon you to make the effort to be academically productive, which is hard given that you're going to be working 80+ hours/week doing your clinical stuff.
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How about the top 5 programs that actually teach and let you operate
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(11-24-2020, 01:53 PM)Guest Wrote: GuestDoes anyone else find it silly that Mayo is interviewing 100 ppl this year? It's almost not worth going

who told you they interview 100 people lol? There are only 3 sessions and there are 15-20 each...that does not make 100 people...but yes don’t go...there are people would love to go in your place

Yea that's definitely not true. They usually interview 30-35 people. The reason it's a lot more this year is because all the people who would've rotated (like me) got automatic interview invites and a whole interview weekend to themselves. Normally they interview all their Sub-Is on site, regardless of how competitive they are on paper and they extended that courtesy to this cycle. That doesn't mean that all those people will be ranked. I doubt that anything changes this year, especially if you're competitive enough to be interviewed during the normal weekends as a non-rotator. If anything you probably have an advantage this cycle because no one was actually able to Sub-I this year and lock up spots.
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(Yesterday, 05:27 PM)Guest Wrote: How about the top 5 programs that actually teach and let you operate

Perhaps even harder to answer since every program lies about/over-inflates their volume and based upon interviews so far, every resident group says they have great autonomy. Based upon reputation, blue chip "OR focused" programs are Pitt, BNI. Jefferson, Miami, UCSF, Baylor are also supposed to have good OR training. Mayo and Duke both embrace graded-autonomy programs, with Duke using an app that allows attendings to check how far you've progressed/how good you are in the eyes of the other attendings who have worked with you so far, and Mayo employing a true mentorship model where you gain autonomy early because you work with the same 1-2 attendings for 2-3 months in a row. OSU, Semmes-Murphey, and Rush are also supposed to have decent volume; OSU indicates that they are attempting to bump program to 4/yr because of volume increase (3/yr right now) and I think Rush is trying to increase to 3/yr (2/3/2 r/n). Hopkins, MGH, Columbia are more "watcher" programs, but they have undeniably better political connections that the others, so it depends on whether your ultimate goal is to move up the career ladder in academic neurosurgery, or to be good in the OR.

(Yesterday, 06:39 PM)Guest Wrote:
(11-24-2020, 01:53 PM)Guest Wrote: GuestDoes anyone else find it silly that Mayo is interviewing 100 ppl this year? It's almost not worth going

who told you they interview 100 people lol? There are only 3 sessions and there are 15-20 each...that does not make 100 people...but yes don’t go...there are people would love to go in your place

Yea that's definitely not true. They usually interview 30-35 people. The reason it's a lot more this year is because all the people who would've rotated (like me) got automatic interview invites and a whole interview weekend to themselves. Normally they interview all their Sub-Is on site, regardless of how competitive they are on paper and they extended that courtesy to this cycle. That doesn't mean that all those people will be ranked. I doubt that anything changes this year, especially if you're competitive enough to be interviewed during the normal weekends as a non-rotator. If anything you probably have an advantage this cycle because no one was actually able to Sub-I this year and lock up spots.
Plus I'd guess that Mayo is probably also getting the feeling that lots of the top programs are fighting over the same 10% of applicants, so they want to make sure they get 4 good matches on Match Day vs having to deal with the headache of the SOAP because some people that they thought were solid locks actually decided to go to another program.
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I love this time of year, watching med students nitpick about programs and not realizing that ultimately, if you're a good resident, it probably won't make a difference.
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