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How important is innate manual dexterity?
#11
Agree it is a perishable skill. I had an attending who never took more than 4 days off because he did not want his skills to rust. He was a terrible surgeon and it was responsible of him not to take time off.
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#12
I'm worried for the next generation. Residents would rather go home than stay post call and refine their skills in the lab
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#13
(02-17-2021, 09:18 AM)Guest Wrote: I'm worried for the next generation. Residents would rather go home than stay post call and refine their skills in the lab

Case volumes are much higher now and surgeries are more reproduce-able. We can’t all be MTL and we don’t need to be
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#14
(02-17-2021, 09:40 AM)Guest Wrote:
(02-17-2021, 09:18 AM)Guest Wrote: I'm worried for the next generation. Residents would rather go home than stay post call and refine their skills in the lab

Case volumes are much higher now and surgeries are more reproduce-able. We can’t all be MTL and we don’t need to be

Average graduating case numbers is only one thing though and agree with the initial post that a lot of the present residents scare the be-jesus out of me. Case volumes are higher, but resident autonomy is much lower esp. at the East Coast institutions (just the nature of the medico-legal environment and the willingness of patients to shop around at multiple places for their care). The number of cases on your ACGME log is less important than what you do in the case. 1600 cases where you watched for 1000 <<<< 1000 cases where you're first assist and solidly involved in all parts of the case. Similarly, the guy/gal who does 800 trauma cranis may be great at that, but may not be the person I want taking out my skull base chondrosarcoma.
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#15
(02-17-2021, 10:00 AM)Guest Wrote:
(02-17-2021, 09:40 AM)Guest Wrote:
(02-17-2021, 09:18 AM)Guest Wrote: I'm worried for the next generation. Residents would rather go home than stay post call and refine their skills in the lab

Case volumes are much higher now and surgeries are more reproduce-able. We can’t all be MTL and we don’t need to be

Average graduating case numbers is only one thing though and agree with the initial post that a lot of the present residents scare the be-jesus out of me. Case volumes are higher, but resident autonomy is much lower esp. at the East Coast institutions (just the nature of the medico-legal environment and the willingness of patients to shop around at multiple places for their care). The number of cases on your ACGME log is less important than what you do in the case. 1600 cases where you watched for 1000 <<<< 1000 cases where you're first assist and solidly involved in all parts of the case. Similarly, the guy/gal who does 800 trauma cranis may be great at that, but may not be the person I want taking out my skull base chondrosarcoma.

That’s it, training these days is safer for patients but worse for residents with how low autonomy is at many programs. Combine that with work hours and the lifestyle focus of this generation you have the perfect setup for poor quality surgeons
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#16
(02-17-2021, 09:03 PM)Guest Wrote:
(02-17-2021, 10:00 AM)Guest Wrote:
(02-17-2021, 09:40 AM)Guest Wrote:
(02-17-2021, 09:18 AM)Guest Wrote: I'm worried for the next generation. Residents would rather go home than stay post call and refine their skills in the lab

Case volumes are much higher now and surgeries are more reproduce-able. We can’t all be MTL and we don’t need to be

Average graduating case numbers is only one thing though and agree with the initial post that a lot of the present residents scare the be-jesus out of me. Case volumes are higher, but resident autonomy is much lower esp. at the East Coast institutions (just the nature of the medico-legal environment and the willingness of patients to shop around at multiple places for their care). The number of cases on your ACGME log is less important than what you do in the case. 1600 cases where you watched for 1000 <<<< 1000 cases where you're first assist and solidly involved in all parts of the case. Similarly, the guy/gal who does 800 trauma cranis may be great at that, but may not be the person I want taking out my skull base chondrosarcoma.

That’s it, training these days is safer for patients but worse for residents with how low autonomy is at many programs. Combine that with work hours and the lifestyle focus of this generation you have the perfect setup for poor quality surgeons

That's an X-er if I ever heard one. Boomer-lite!
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