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Best ABNS Study Resources?
#1
What are the most useful ABNS study resources? Any good lecture series? Trying to figure out what I should purchase.
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#2
bump. Any insight would be appreciated.
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#3
Citow, sans questions
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#4
Just took the exam this year and scored in the 98th percentile.

My advice is there is no substitute for time. You can pass with 2 months of dedicated studying, but if you want to do very well, plan to put in at least double that.

It's no different from any other standardized test you've taken. Find the strategy that works well for you and the textbook formats from which you can learn easily. Not everybody can learn from the (I think) very poorly formatted Citow or the paragraph style of Psarros.

My thoughts:
- Draw it To Know It (look it up) as a starting point for basic neuroanatomy. It will not be complete - fill in the gaps in your knowledge as you complete questions.
- Rhoton book, videos, or lectures for surgical anatomy. There were at least 10 questions (many pictures taken straight from Rhoton) on this year's exam on these topics.
- Neuropathology seems to be less tested these days, but know the classic slide findings inside and out. Look at tons of online slides. Use the WHO book as a reference.
- What IS increasingly tested in neuropath is molecular diagnosis and trends. GBM, Oligo, BRAF, new chemo classes, etc. Learn it well.
- In 3 years of taking the test, I have had 1 question on the mucopolysaccharidoses, sphingolipidoses, etc. Know those tables, but don't go nuts.
- Steep yourself in neurosurgical education available online. There are tons of videos from AANS, CNS, Seattle Science Foundation, all the journals, etc. You may not think that hearing basic talks would be very educational, but the more you hear this stuff, I promise you that you'll be surprised at what you absorb.

And then - questions, questions, questions. Take your time and go thru the answers. Remember that not all question banks are created equally or are very accurate, but you probably aren't wasting your time doing tons of them.

Best of luck.
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#5
(05-14-2018, 04:16 PM)Guest Wrote: Just took the exam this year and scored in the 98th percentile.

My advice is there is no substitute for time.  You can pass with 2 months of dedicated studying, but if you want to do very well, plan to put in at least double that.

It's no different from any other standardized test you've taken.  Find the strategy that works well for you and the textbook formats from which you can learn easily.  Not everybody can learn from the (I think) very poorly formatted Citow or the paragraph style of Psarros.

My thoughts:
- Draw it To Know It (look it up) as a starting point for basic neuroanatomy.  It will not be complete - fill in the gaps in your knowledge as you complete questions.
- Rhoton book, videos, or lectures for surgical anatomy.  There were at least 10 questions (many pictures taken straight from Rhoton) on this year's exam on these topics.
- Neuropathology seems to be less tested these days, but know the classic slide findings inside and out.  Look at tons of online slides.  Use the WHO book as a reference.
- What IS increasingly tested in neuropath is molecular diagnosis and trends.  GBM, Oligo, BRAF, new chemo classes, etc.  Learn it well.
- In 3 years of taking the test, I have had 1 question on the mucopolysaccharidoses, sphingolipidoses, etc.  Know those tables, but don't go nuts.
- Steep yourself in neurosurgical education available online.  There are tons of videos from AANS, CNS, Seattle Science Foundation, all the journals, etc.  You may not think that hearing basic talks would be very educational, but the more you hear this stuff, I promise you that you'll be surprised at what you absorb.

And then - questions, questions, questions.  Take your time and go thru the answers.  Remember that not all question banks are created equally or are very accurate, but you probably aren't wasting your time doing tons of them.

Best of luck.

Thank you so much for this information. What question banks would you recommend/not recommend?
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#6
New question book coming out in September from thieme. Neurosurgery primary exam review. 1600 questions with an online question bank version so you don't have to flip back and forth between the question/answer pages. Answer explanations will have links to read more in-depth about the content being tested through MedOne Neurosurgery.
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#7
I liked OnlineMedEd Its kind of like skeleton notes and you can use other resources to expand on things that dont make sense to you if needed.
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