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Hobbies?
#1
For the nsgy residents/attendings out there? Do you have any hobbies?

As a med student, I love the high acuity (or high stakes) parts of nsgy (vascular/tumor). However, I also value having a life outside of the hospital. I haven’t seen a thread on this yet so I thought I would bring it up. Is it possible to balance dedication to cerebrovascular neurosurgery and non-neurosurgery interests?
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#2
Yeah you can have hobbies. Your ability to do them will fluctuate but that doesn't mean you should give them up entirely. I run 2-3 times a week, have dogs and a family, and try to have some type of "date" excursion with my spouse weekly.
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#3
(10-14-2020, 02:56 PM)skullbased69 Wrote: For the nsgy residents/attendings out there? Do you have any hobbies?

As a med student, I love the high acuity (or high stakes) parts of nsgy (vascular/tumor). However, I also value having a life outside of the hospital. I haven’t seen a thread on this yet so I thought I would bring it up. Is it possible to balance dedication to cerebrovascular neurosurgery and non-neurosurgery interests?

Your life as an attending is pretty much dictated by what kind of job you have. In PP (mix of tumors/spine, basically no vascular), I can do whatever I want as long as I'm OK with making less money. And I am, so I get plenty of time with my family and for hobbies. I take call 1-2 times a week at lvl 2 trauma and get called in maybe once a month to see something emergent. Being NSGY there are high acuity things and add-ons and whatnot, but that's with most surgical specialties. In academic practice your contract and call expectations will influence a lot of how busy you are. Nowadays, almost all CV surgeons are doing endovascular and with that comes stroke call. That seems absolutely brutal esp if there are only 1-2 folks covering a stroke center. And there are folks who live/eat/breathe our field and their research...they usually go on to become the leaders, as is the case in any profession.

Residency is a different story because your time is not your own. That's the way it should be, you are learning constantly.

That said, there's the old saying that if you need something done, give it to the busiest person in the room. Tons of neurosurgeons do distance running, watersports, write a lot, read a lot, work with foundations, and raise families. Can't promise they're doing everything well, but it's something besides neurosurgery. Your career will (and should) dominate your life if you're a neurosurgeon, but you can do other things.
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