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Barrow
#61
(03-29-2020, 07:27 PM)I Guest Wrote:
(03-29-2020, 03:38 PM)Guest Wrote: Completely agree. Better operative experience seen during my sub-I there than anywhere in the country. Is it perfect for everyone's (sometimes naive) stated interest as an MS4? Of course not.

From the article: “What makes a great surgeon is unrelenting practice.” So, you can complain about "athletes" (read: people with tangible interests that include things other than neurosurgery) or make light of "private surgeon" training. However, academic neurosurgery is filled to the brim with people who enjoy "talking about neurosurgery", but who out of residency couldn't operate their way out of a wet paper bag because they spent 7 years triple-scrubbing laminectomies. Barrow tends to train surgeons who enjoy...being surgeons.

Some of the most talented neurosurgeons are in academic medicine

Some of the biggest frauds are in academic medicine. I mean fraud in the sense of the previous poster who said “they like to talk about neurosurgery. Go to a meeting and look around a lot of the empty suits on stage do maybe 100 cases a year.
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#62
(03-29-2020, 08:44 PM)Guest Wrote:
(03-29-2020, 07:27 PM)I Guest Wrote:
(03-29-2020, 03:38 PM)Guest Wrote: Completely agree. Better operative experience seen during my sub-I there than anywhere in the country. Is it perfect for everyone's (sometimes naive) stated interest as an MS4? Of course not.

From the article: “What makes a great surgeon is unrelenting practice.” So, you can complain about "athletes" (read: people with tangible interests that include things other than neurosurgery) or make light of "private surgeon" training. However, academic neurosurgery is filled to the brim with people who enjoy "talking about neurosurgery", but who out of residency couldn't operate their way out of a wet paper bag because they spent 7 years triple-scrubbing laminectomies. Barrow tends to train surgeons who enjoy...being surgeons.

Some of the most talented neurosurgeons are in academic medicine

Some of the biggest frauds are in academic medicine. I mean fraud in the sense of the previous poster who said “they like to talk about neurosurgery. Go to a meeting and look around a lot of the empty suits on stage do maybe 100 cases a year.

When people post stuff like this I just wonder if they don't see that this is literally how all of society functions in terms of hierarchy
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#63
Agree. Some of the biggest frauds are academic neurosurgeons. Just wait wait till residency.
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#64
...Perhaps "heirarchy" as your worldview is filtered to see...

However, for >80-90% of real people, they care far more about a neuroSURGEON's "unrelenting practice", reps in the OR, dedication to graceful surgical excellence, quantified number of times and variations of their pathology that they have PERSONALLY operated on, and ability to quickly and fastidiously manage unexpected complications (because that high-volume surgeon has seen each and every version of them, common and rare). Rest assured: Most real people outside of neurosurgery who suffer from the terrible and complex diseases that we manage care far less about your ivory tower packed with low/mid-range volume surgeons churning out publications often written by medical students and junior residents.

*hierarchy
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#65
(03-29-2020, 11:19 PM)Guest Wrote: ...Perhaps "heirarchy" as your worldview is filtered to see...

However, for >80-90% of real people, they care far more about a neuroSURGEON's "unrelenting practice", reps in the OR, dedication to graceful surgical excellence, quantified number of times and variations of their pathology that they have PERSONALLY operated on, and ability to quickly and fastidiously manage unexpected complications (because that high-volume surgeon has seen each and every version of them, common and rare). Rest assured: Most real people outside of neurosurgery who suffer from the terrible and complex diseases that we manage care far less about your ivory tower packed with low/mid-range volume surgeons churning out publications often written by medical students and junior residents.

*hierarchy


Can anyone name names? Either way, those academics who manage to operate, research, and educate vs. the “empty suits” who like to talk about neurosurgery?  Aside from doing residency at a place who can we find out who is who?
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#66
(03-31-2020, 03:06 PM)Guest Wrote:
(03-29-2020, 11:19 PM)Guest Wrote: ...Perhaps "heirarchy" as your worldview is filtered to see...

However, for >80-90% of real people, they care far more about a neuroSURGEON's "unrelenting practice", reps in the OR, dedication to graceful surgical excellence, quantified number of times and variations of their pathology that they have PERSONALLY operated on, and ability to quickly and fastidiously manage unexpected complications (because that high-volume surgeon has seen each and every version of them, common and rare). Rest assured: Most real people outside of neurosurgery who suffer from the terrible and complex diseases that we manage care far less about your ivory tower packed with low/mid-range volume surgeons churning out publications often written by medical students and junior residents.

*hierarchy


Can anyone name names? Either way, those academics who manage to operate, research, and educate vs. the “empty suits” who like to talk about neurosurgery?  Aside from doing residency at a place who can we find out who is who?

Operative skill is inversely proportional to time spent on Twitter
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